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Teenaged chickens
were brought into an indoor pen
in the barn,
to help them acclimate
to their new home.
This week,
we opened the lid
and they are free to roam the barn,
acclimating to their larger home
and to personal contact
with their housemates:
older chickens
and two flocks of guinea fowl.
They are venturing a little further
into the barn each day.
The youngest of the guineas
are the first to approach them.

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Nearby,
a guinea hen is about two weeks
into her nest-sitting.
We are very glad
she has made a nest of eggs
inside
rather than outside.
Last spring,
after hatching a flock
in the corral,
she lost everyone—
either from wet grass
or predators.
Her partner,
who keeps watch while she sits,
stood in the corral
and called the little ones
for two days.
We hope the newborn keets
will be safer in the barn.

Though I keep saying it,
I can’t really express
the depth of this statement
(maybe repeating it will express it):
life with chickens and guineas
is rich and wonderful.