DSC_0033

IMG_7320

Last April,
permaculturist Mark Shepard
came from Wisconsin
and guided us through the process
of creating swales and berms
on the prairie hillside above the Big Pond.
Rain came immediately,
to our utter astonishment
and profound appreciation,
and the swales slowed the water,
directed it to pocket ponds
so it could slowly soak
into the prairie
instead of rushing down the hillside.
It was an unusual summer;
periodic rains came in the hotter months.
Though we had no “gulley-washers”
to completely fill farm ponds,
the swales and berms
allowed the rains to slow
and soak
and the grass grew
lushly.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

DSCN0890

The time has come
to plant trees and shrubs
along the berms and swales.
Ann and Frank
dug 180 holes
and this weekend
a Boy Scout troop
will help us
plant…
American Plum
Indian Currant
Native Pecan
Red Mulberry—
to further prevent erosion,
provide food and habitat
for bees, animals
and humans.
Maybe this project
will guide us to new,
less-invasive,
healthier ways
to grow food
right here amidst the native grasses,
(without destroying their 20-feet-long roots)
and in spite of the windy,
drought-to-flood extreme conditions
of the Great Plains.

DSCN2759

DSCN2756