From personal experience,
we know
that when you photograph
or draw
or write
what you see in the natural world
you see it more intricately,
thoroughly
and tumble into
wonder
more surely.
Our friend Jane Taylor
is a gifted observer
because she writes
and what she writes
is deeply beautiful.
So we are thrilled
that she is coming to Turtle Rock Farm
to lead a writing workshop
May 3.

Here’s how she describes the day:

This is a day-long workshop for new and experienced writers who want to explore or deepen his or her understanding of poetry as a lyrical form. Form will be a guide, but not a strict rule.  Emphasis will be on the mysteries of language, our relationships to the earth, and on listening, discovery, and compassionate sharing. The Owl will serve, as she has over the ages, to remind us of the mythologies we encounter and carry with us in our daily lives. You are invited to spend an extraordinary day at Turtle Rock. Wear your comfortable clothes and shoes for possible hiking. Bring your ordinary stories and be transformed in a natural circle of writers.

You can register on our website.

Consider joining us.
We look forward to a wonderful day,
and all that emerges.

Here’s one of Jane’s published poems:

Watercolors                         
             signed N. Bird, 1967.
A pile of watercolor painting tied with string
and I begin to barter for them
as though they were meant for me,
these unframed 10x16 giant holy cards,

holy cards sans halos, saints, enraptured faces.
I see the holiness of bare and bark-white trees.
They breathe in their nakedness and make
the winter winter.
They are watered by a stream that dreams 
of resting soon in ice, 
if the washy gray-green clouds are true.
I believe they are.
I know the likeness isn’t perfect.
Perhaps the sycamore (we call the button-wood) 
should thicken toward the base, 
be more deeply furrowed.
But I believe this watercolor world. I see
there is no bird, no red of hope, no cardinal
quiet in the branch, not even a blackbird wing 
to take us into spring before the hardest freeze.
If only I knew how to stand the cold, and wait,
and paint that kind of white, 
that true and lonely blue.
 
                                    Jane Vincent Taylor
                                            Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
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Workshop leader is Jane Vincent Taylor. Jane has a Master’s in Creative Writing from University of Central Oklahoma, a Master of Library Science and a BA in Women’s Studies from O.U.  She lives in Oklahoma City. She is a Virginia Center for Creative Arts Fellow. Journal publications include Red Cedar Review, Nimrod, Whetstone, Enigmatist, Red Plains Review, Calyx, Flyway, Third Wednesday, Rhino, and many others. Jane also teaches writing at Ghost Ranch, Abique, NM. Recent publications and activities are posted at janevincenttaylor.blogspot.com.