The day was beautiful:
a cooler, sunny September morning
with no wind. MaryAnn Sonntag taught us
the history of the labyrinth,
various stories about building
and walking
this ancient spiritual phenomenon.
And then we set out,
over the pond dam
through a gauntlet of 7-foot tall
sunflowers
and, at our feet, billowing bunches
of bright yellow Broomweed,
freshly blossomed.
Across the slightly gooey shale
pond channel (it had rained a bit
overnight,) up into the prairie
passed the Turtle Rocks on the hillside
then, atop the prairie,
we paused to take in the 360-degree view
of sky and grass and trees
before making our intentions
and entering the 11-circuit labyrinth
mowed into the tall grass.
As we entered,
MaryAnn began her long, slow, circular walks
around the outside of the labyrinth, holding
us and the energy of the labyrinth,
sometimes holding a bell
that rang softly as she passed.

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Describing what happens
to each
walking the labyrinth
would be to remove something
sacred from them. It’s beyond
words anyway.

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All on this Saturday
had walked labyrinths before.
The prairie labyrinth at Turtle Rock Farm
is different. It’s big. It’s outdoors
under an endless sky,
within tall Blue Stem, tiny flowers at foot;
crickets and cicadea and birds
and sunshine
and clear, soft air.
In such a place,
slowly following the turns
to the center
and out again,
no wonder
there is
connection,
within and without.

Thank you MaryAnn!