Exploring a Tributary of Doe Creek

Exploring a Tributary of Doe Creek

We are learning about our ecoregion and this week had the great pleasure of exploring our streams with Jean Lemmon, from Blue Thumb, a water pollution education program of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission’s Water Quality Division. We explored along Doe Creek and one of its tributaries. Doe Creek runs through the land we live on and steward. We also went to Red Rock Creek, which is the largest creek in our watershed. It also runs through land we steward.

Friends were visiting from Tulsa, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where it’s spring break. So we had the good fortune to experience teenage girls experiencing stream life as well. It was a very good day: great to be in good company, there was no wind and it was warm and sunny. And then there were the discoveries…

Looking for Life Under Rocks

Looking for Life Under Rocks

Exploring creeks is going to become part of our life now. We are learning to monitor monthly the water quality. But this gives us the opportunity to explore more deeply and learn about the ecosystem in the creeks. Yesterday we discovered exposed bedrock in a lovely portion of Doe Creek, right there in the pasture. Jean showed us how to see what lives under water-covered rocks. We saw Mayflies and Cadid larvae. Ladybugs were sunning themselves and taking a dip in Red Rock Creek. These are good signs of healthy streams. (If the insects have legs, which the Mayflies do, it indicates a healthier stream. Legless insects can tolerate less healthy streams.)

Jean explaining algae growth on pond beavers have created on Doe Creek

Jean explaining algae growth on pond beavers have created on Doe Creek

There’s more to learn, more to see. We are grateful for the opportunity to get to know more of our neighbors.

Paula and Ann Resting on Bedrock at Doe Creek

Paula and Ann Resting on Bedrock at Doe Creek

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